Are these club tipped anemones bad?

What is that and where did it come from.

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Crustman
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Are these club tipped anemones bad?

Post by Crustman » Thu Oct 16, 2008 7:44 pm

These are with the star coral, zooanthids. Are they bad for a reef tank?
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Crustman
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Post by Crustman » Thu Oct 16, 2008 7:49 pm

close up. Thanks Tom

Crustman
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Post by Crustman » Thu Oct 16, 2008 7:54 pm

One more try
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reefman8471
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Aiptasia

Post by reefman8471 » Thu Oct 16, 2008 9:30 pm

Yes they are bad for reef tanks. They are caused Aiptasia. They are anemones that can reproduce asexually and often do in aquariums. They do not require high light output to do well. One or two can quickly turn into many anemones. They are capable of stinging your corals. There are many ways to fight Aiptasia. I use kalkwasser (calcium hydroxide) mixed with water. The pH is 12 and all you have to do is turn off your water pumps and apply it to the oral disc of the anemone. You can use a syringe or an eye dropper. You have to be careful not to put too much kalkwasser into the tank at one time as it can raise your tank's pH drastically. It can also burn your corals if you get it on them. There are other safer alternatives on the market that you can apply just like kalkwasser. The other option is to get something that will eat the anemones. Many people like Peppermint shrimp. They do work but also may eat some of your polyps. A greater risk are any of several species of butterfly fish. Many like to use Copperband butterfly fish in their reef tanks. They are not without risk as they usually do not accept prepared food, are very shy at first, and could also eat corals. I have found that some Bicolor Angelfish will eat Aiptasia. They are also a moderate risk with corals as well. If they bother corals it is usually LPS and clam mantles. Whatever you decide to use get to the Aiptasia quickly.

James
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Amphiprion
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Maybe Anemonia cf. "majano"

Post by Amphiprion » Thu Oct 16, 2008 9:43 pm

Those look to be more like the loose conglomerate of anemones collectively known as Anemonia cf. "majano". As the name suggests, the classification is in question. In any case, I would treat them like Aiptasia like James mentioned. They can spread just as quickly, if not potentially worse. There are also proprietary fixes, like "Joe's Juice" and Aiptasia control that seem to be fairly effective if you pay careful attention and make sure you cover the entire animal.
Andrew

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Crustman
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Post by Crustman » Sat Oct 18, 2008 9:19 am

Thanks, I see them in other places now. They don't seem to be bothering the star polyps but I will take your advice. They don't look like Aiptasia because the tentacles are short and clubbed at the tips.

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kristo
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Post by kristo » Sat Oct 18, 2008 11:57 am

Andrew,
Could they possibly be curly cues (Bartholomea annulata)??? Havent seen those in a while, but they remind me of them.
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Amphiprion
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Post by Amphiprion » Sun Oct 19, 2008 9:29 am

Nope. Curlicues are actually another Aiptasiid anemone, so they are going to be more similar to Aiptasia. "Majano" anemones are a bunch of anemones sort of grouped together, since nobody really knows what they are called.
Andrew

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