local shrimp

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Kresnahw22
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local shrimp

Post by Kresnahw22 » Mon Dec 13, 2010 7:10 pm

I was wondering if the peppermint shrimp species can be found in gulf shores waters at different times of the year. And what other species that are reef safe

Innerarity Reefs
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Re: local shrimp

Post by Innerarity Reefs » Mon Dec 13, 2010 7:12 pm

Ill have some in this week they arent expensive at all, but I dont know of very many reef safe local shrimp myself ::shrugs::

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Kresnahw22
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Re: local shrimp

Post by Kresnahw22 » Mon Dec 13, 2010 7:25 pm

I'm not really wanting to buy any right now just wondering if they are found around the gulf area incase I decided and got bored to go hunt some lol :)

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AuroraDrvr
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Re: local shrimp

Post by AuroraDrvr » Mon Dec 13, 2010 7:51 pm

Peppermint shrimp is a generic term that covers like 30 different species of shrimp in the Lysmata genus, which is distributed all across the globe. We do have peppermint shrimp here (probably multiple species), but the most common is Lysmata boggessi.

Not too easy to catch, they're found on jetties/reefs.

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Re: local shrimp

Post by Kresnahw22 » Mon Dec 13, 2010 7:56 pm

Lysmata wurdemanni is the species I'm looking far..... besides the shrimps what about any crabs or snails that will consume bryompis algae sorry for spelling and reef safe.... my water is all correct just can't get rid of it.

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Re: local shrimp

Post by AuroraDrvr » Mon Dec 13, 2010 10:28 pm

Lysmata boggessi & Lysmata wurdemanni are nearly identical for all intents and purposes. They are just differentiated by location. However, neither one, actually no shrimp common to the hobby-- will consume hair or byropsis algae in any real amount. Your best bet is Mexican Turbo Snails.

More likely, the algae in your tank is consuming any free phosphates and nitrates. I don't know how to put this any softer, but chances are, your filtration isn't cutting it. Atleast, what I remember your filtration to be. You need some method of nutrient export, whether that comes in the form of a skimmer, refugium filled with a macro algae, frequently recurring large water changes, or any combination of the above.

On my 90 gallon reef, I do not run a skimmer. I used to battle hair algae until I was able to get the chaetomorpha to take hold and start growing.

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Kresnahw22
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Re: local shrimp

Post by Kresnahw22 » Tue Dec 14, 2010 11:54 am

Ok ill consider a protein skimmer....I do good amount of water changes though.... but like I previously stated the algae is probly interfering eith my tests.

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Re: local shrimp

Post by Babyreef » Tue Dec 14, 2010 12:03 pm

depending on the type of coral you have a tiger cowrie with mow through that bryopsis. However i caution you as the cowries will also snack on some lps and may even other coral. Also the money aka gold rim cowrie will eat it but they are slower at it (a lot slower). Ill check for you but i also think a letuce nudi will eat it. Ill check into that though.

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Re: local shrimp

Post by Amphiprion » Tue Dec 14, 2010 1:36 pm

The genus' "wurdemanni" complex is in systematic uproar right now. They are constantly saying there are new species, then retracting, then saying new again. L. boggessi is one of the newer described species at the moment, but the details on identifying them are somewhat murky. There are some details available on striping patterns, but that has proven to be somewhat unreliable, even amongst professionals (larval analysis was needed). L. boggessi is definitely one of the described, currently accepted species in our area, though. As far as it being the most common, I can't comment on that.
Andrew

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